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Upcoming Exhibitions

Essays in Idleness Handscrolls, by Kaiho Yusetsu, partial image of the first of twenty scrolls, Edo period, latter half of the 17th century, Suntory Museum of Art

June 11th (Wed.) to July 21st (Mon.), 2014

Essays in Idleness:
Enjoying Classical Literature Through Art

Essays in Idleness (Tsurezuregusa), written by Yoshida Kenko; in the latter half of the Kamakura period, is regarded, with The Pillow Book (Makura no soshi) and An Account of My Hut (Hojoki), as one of the three great collections of essays in Japanese literature. Essays in Idleness, which begins with the phrase tsurezure naru mama ni, “with nothing better to do,” is one of the most familiar classics of Japanese literature. This exhibition presents famous scenes from those essays through the twenty Essays in Idleness Handscrolls by Kaiho Yusetsu, which were recently added to the museum’s collection, together with folding screens, illustrated books, and other depictions of them.

Essays in Idleness Handscrolls, by Kaiho Yusetsu, partial image of the first of twenty scrolls, Edo period, latter half of the 17th century, Suntory Museum of Art

(Left) Lidded goblet, Bohemia, c.1720, Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague<br>(Right) Lidded goblet, probably made by the glass engraver Edward Benda, c. 1840, Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague

August 2nd (Sat.) to September 28th (Sun.), 2014

The Radiance of Stillness and Motion: Bohemian Glass
from the Collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague

Glass production began in Bohemia (an area corresponding roughly to the Czech Republic today) in the thirteenth century. Bohemian crystal developed in the latter half of the seventeenth century. Its shapes, which suggested carved rock crystal, became highly popular, even dislodging Venetian glass from its once-dominant position. In the early nineteenth century, research on ways to add colors and painted decorations led to the development of increasingly colorful glass. In contemporary glass art, Bohemian glass is the world leader in glass sculpture. This exhibition includes about 170 examples from 600 years of Bohemian glass from the collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague.

(Left) Lidded goblet, Bohemia, c.1720, Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague
(Right) Lidded goblet, probably made by the glass engraver Edward Benda, c. 1840, Museum of Decorative Arts in Prague

(Left) Important Cultural Property, Statue of Kujaku Myoo, by Kaikei, Kamakura period, Kongobuji<br>(Right) National Treasure, Standing Statues of Eight Attendants of Fudo Myoo (Seitaka Doji), by Unkei, Kamakura period, Kongobuji

October 11th (Sat.) to December 7th (Sun.), 2014

Koyasan 1200th Anniversary
Treasures of the Sacred Mountain (TBC)

The monk Kuai founded a Shingon esoteric Buddhist monastic training center on Mt. Koya in 816. Over 1200 years, Mt. Koya has remained sacred ground for Buddhism in Japan while one of the most remarkable collections of treasures of Buddhist art has been assembled atop the mountain. This exhibition offers an opportunity to see rare works from that mountaintop, including implements for rituals and script associated with Kukai , Buddhist paintings based on the doctrines of Shingon esoteric Buddhism, and Keiha school Buddhist sculptures, including the Standing Statues of Eight Attendants of Fudo Myoo. This exhibition is a not-to-be-missed opportunity to experience the essence of this aspect of Japanese culture, nurtured spirit of Kukai and over the centuries at Mt. Koya.

(Left) Important Cultural Property, Statue of Kujaku Myoo, by Kaikei, Kamakura period, Kongobuji
(Right) National Treasure, Standing Statues of Eight Attendants of Fudo Myoo (Seitaka Doji), by Unkei, Kamakura period, Kongobuji

Openwork Bowl with Cherry and Maple Tree Design, by Nin’ami Dohachi; Edo period, 19th century; Suntory Museum of Art

December 20th (Sat.), 2014, to March 1st (Sun.), 2015

Nin’ami Dohachi
Master of Kyoto Ceramics (TBC)

In the period from about 1804 to 1844, Kyoto produced many highly skilled potters. Among them, Nin’ami Dohachi (1783-1855) is particularly admired as a master of Japanese-style Kyoyaki, or Kyoto ceramics, partaking of a tradition that includes Ninsei and Kenzan. This exhibition introduces Nin’ami Dohachi’s oeuvre through a large number of his works, including matcha teawares, sencha teawares, and tableware for serving kaiseki cuisine.

Openwork Bowl with Cherry and Maple Tree Design, by Nin’ami Dohachi; Edo period, 19th century; Suntory Museum of Art


 
 

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